Sun Path

In the Northern hemisphere, the Sun appears to move to the right. In the Southern hemisphere, it appears to move to the left. During sunrise and sunset, the path of the Sun forms an angle that roughly corresponds to the latitude of the observer. This phenomenon occurs because observers on the different locations on Earth’s surface is not standing on the same plane.

The path of the Sun observed from many different locations on Earth’s surface is evidence of spherical Earth. This observation cannot possibly occur on a flat Earth.

Continue reading “Sun Path”

The Failure of Flat-Earth Model to Explain Emergency Landings That Occur More to the South

The perpetrators of flat-Earth often take emergency landings as ‘proof’ of a flat Earth. They would point out that the diversion airports used for such emergency landings are somehow consistent with the flat-Earth map.

It is not a coincidence that all the cases of emergency landing they pointed out occurred far in the north. At the locations closer to the north pole, the distortion of the azimuthal-equidistant map (claimed by flat-Earthers as the ‘flat-Earth map’) diminishes. It would seemingly appear as if the ‘flat-Earth map’ can explain the choice of the diversion airports. In many other locations, though, the flat-Earth map would fail to explain it.

Continue reading “The Failure of Flat-Earth Model to Explain Emergency Landings That Occur More to the South”

The Southern Hemisphere: Where Many Flat-Earth Claims Fall Apart

Flat-Earth is a concept initially intended for the potential victims in the northern hemisphere. At a glance, some of the claims are seemingly in line with reality in the northern hemisphere, but they would fall apart when verified and tested in the southern hemisphere.

90% of all humans live in the northern hemisphere. It made sense for the creators of the flat-Earth notion to invent their ‘facts’ with the northern population in mind.

Continue reading “The Southern Hemisphere: Where Many Flat-Earth Claims Fall Apart”

Day and Night Areas on a Flat Earth

Featured Video Play Icon

At any given time, there is an equal area of the Earth that is experiencing daytime, and that is having a night time. The reason is that the sun is very far, and it would illuminate a hemisphere of the Earth, and leave the other dark.

If we plot which areas of the Earth that are getting sunlight on an azimuthal equidistant map centered on the north pole, the sun would appear to illuminate a somewhat elliptical area during the northern hemisphere summer, and a lopsided Bat-Signal shaped area during the winter. During the equinox, the sun would appear to illuminate a half-circle area.

Continue reading “Day and Night Areas on a Flat Earth”

Stars in the Southern Sky: Evidence That the Earth is a Rotating Sphere

If we look south in any location in the southern hemisphere, we are going to see the same set of stars. The stars are seen rotating around the south celestial pole, in the Octans constellation, nearby the star Sigma Octantis.

This phenomenon is unexplainable in the flat-Earth model. Looking at the so-called ‘flat-Earth map’, we should see the different set of stars on the different location in the southern hemisphere. The reason is that the so-called ‘flat-Earth map’ does not represent the real Earth.

Continue reading “Stars in the Southern Sky: Evidence That the Earth is a Rotating Sphere”

The December Solstice: When The Sun Illuminates An Impossible Shape in the Flat-Earth Model

The December solstice occurs between the 20th and 22nd in December, which is when the Sun reaches its most southerly excursion. Around this time, the northern hemisphere experiences winter, and conversely, the southern hemisphere experiences summer.

If we try to plot the areas that are having daytime and nighttime on the so-called ‘flat-Earth map’, the Sun would appear to illuminate an impossible area, similar to Batman’s bat-signal. This fact tells us that the ‘flat-Earth map’ does not conform with reality.

Continue reading “The December Solstice: When The Sun Illuminates An Impossible Shape in the Flat-Earth Model”

The Cities of Punta Arenas, Dunedin, and Murmansk During the December Solstice

During the December solstice, on December 21, the Sun reaches its southernmost point. During this time, the northern parts of the Earth are experiencing the peak of winter, and conversely, the southern parts are experiencing the peak of summer.

Most flat-Earth denominations picture the sun shining like a spotlight, and they can’t explain what is happening in the southern parts of the Earth during the December solstice.

Continue reading “The Cities of Punta Arenas, Dunedin, and Murmansk During the December Solstice”