The Varying Earth-Moon Proportions in Different Pictures

How an object appears in a photograph depends on perspective —the position of the camera relative to the object—, and field of view of the camera. The farther the object, the smaller the object will appear in the resulting image; and conversely, the closer the object, the larger it will appear. The narrower the field of view, the larger the object will appear in the image; and conversely the wider the field of view, the smaller the object will appear.

Flat-Earthers take the varying proportions of the Earth & Moon in different pictures as a glaring inconsistency. They are wrong. The pictures were simply taken from a different perspective and field of view.

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Determining the Visibility of a Star From Its Declination and the Observer’s Latitude

We can determine if a star is visible from a specific location using the declination of the star and the latitude of the observer, subject to other conditions like observer’s topology, the magnitude of the star, weather conditions, etc. It is possible to do this because Earth is a rotating sphere.

If the Earth is flat, every star would have been visible all night from every location. We don’t see the same stars every night because some of them are below the horizon and obscured by the Earth.

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Observations of Sunspots From Multiple Locations on Earth

Sunspots are darker spots on the surface of the Sun. The location where sunspots appear is unpredictable, but the appearance of sunspots is always the same when observed from anywhere on Earth; only the orientation is different on different observer location. Observers on the opposite position on the Earth will see the sunspots reversed. The reason is that the Earth is a sphere. Any two observers on Earth’s surface are not standing on the same plane.

Some flat-Earthers have spatial awareness difficulties and present the difference of the appearance of sunspots as ‘evidence’ the Earth is not spherical. They are wrong. If the Sun were close as in the flat Earth model, we would see the different appearance of sunspots on the different observer location. In reality, everyone on Earth observes the same appearance of sunspots, only with the different orientation that corresponds to the position of the observer.

Geometry of a Full Moon

Some people are confused that a full moon is visible all night, and think if the full moon is the result of the opposition of the moon from the sun, then a full moon should be visible only at midnight.

Flat-Earthers who have such spatial visualization problem take a step further and use it as ‘evidence’ that the Earth is not a sphere. They are wrong. The full moon phenomenon can easily be explained in the spherical Earth model.

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Observing Mercury and Venus

Mercury and Venus are closer to the Sun compared to the Earth. The best condition to observe these planets is during some time after sunset or before sunrise. In some cases, they are even visible in the day.

Many flat-Earthers think that it should be impossible to observe Mercury & Venus as they are closer to the Sun. They are wrong.

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