Magnetic Poles

Every magnet has a north pole and a south pole. The opposite poles of the different magnets attract each other, while the same poles of the different magnets repel each other. It is not possible to have a magnet with a single pole.

Flat-Earthers proclaim that Earth cannot be a sphere because if a compass really points to the north pole, then on the equator, it should point 45° downward. They are wrong. A magnet does not only have the north pole, but it also has the south pole which is attracted to the north pole of Earth’s magnetic field. Near the equator, both forces are balanced and pull the compass’ needle to both Earth’s poles at the same time. A perfectly balanced compass will be level near the equator.

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Countering Gravity

Gravity is not the only force. There are other forces, too. Multiple forces can simultaneously affect a single object. Forces can counteract gravity, making an object move against the direction of gravity. Such facts do not disprove gravity.

Flat-Earthers take the fact there are objects that move against the direction of gravity as ‘evidence’ of the non-existence of gravity. They are wrong. There are forces other than gravity affecting the object, having the opposite direction from gravity, with at least the same magnitude.

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Magnetic Dip

Magnetic dip is the angle between the horizontal and Earth’s magnetic field. A compass needle, for example, will not point north and south, but will also have a dip. It tends to dip at an angle toward the Earth (and to the sky). The dip is generally greater toward the pole.  At various locations close to the equator (but not exactly at the equator), the dip is zero.

Magnetic dip as observed on various locations on Earth can only happen if the Earth is spherical.

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