Geostationary Satellites

A satellite can be placed in an orbit 35786 km above Earth’s surface, and the satellite will be in motion at the same speed as the rotation of the Earth. As a result, the satellite will appear practically motionless when observed from the surface.  Many communication satellites are placed in this orbit, and a satellite dish receiving signals from the satellite doesn’t have to track the satellite.

Flat-Earthers often take the fact that satellites are in motion and most satellite dishes have a fixed direction as ‘proof’ there’s something suspicious about satellites. They are wrong.

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The Length of Daytime and Nights in the Flat Earth Model

The majority of the flat Earth models place the Arctic Ocean in the middle of the flat Earth, and Antarctica at the edge of it. The Sun is pictured floating and moving in a circle above it. The Sun’s area of light is limited to a circular area below it, like a spotlight.

A problem: a simple observation of day and night cycles in a different area of the world cannot be explained in this flat Earth model.

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