Fisheye Videos

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In images taken using a fisheye lens, a straight line will remain straight if it crosses the center of the image. We can use this attribute to determine if a line is straight in reality.

In any fisheye videos taken from a high altitude, there should be plenty of moments where the horizon crosses the center of the image, and we can use those to determine that the horizon line is curved in the real world.

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Excessively Defishing Fisheye Images to Flatten the Curved Horizon

Defishing is a process for removing barrel distortions in fisheye images. It takes fisheye images, and convert them to normal, rectilinear images that preserve straight lines. Different fisheye lenses can have a different amount of distortions, and thus, require a different defishing strength.

Some flat-Earthers would deliberately use stronger defishing parameters than necessary for the lens being used. Their intention is not to remove the barrel distortion in the resulting images, but also to introduce pincushion distortions to the images. Pincushion distortion is the reverse of barrel distortion. It would curve a straight line to the other direction from what would be produced by the barrel distortion in fisheye lenses. At a specific position in the scene, it would make the curved horizon to appear flat.

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The Amount of Curvature that Appears in Photographs of the Horizon

The amount of horizon curvature that appears in a photograph of the horizon depends on several factors:

  1. The altitude of the observer.
  2. The field of view of the camera.
  3. Lens distortions of the camera.

Some flat-Earthers assume that we should see the same amount of Earth’s curvature everywhere. And when they see the different amount of curvature in the different picture of Earth’s curvature, they wrongly took it as “proof” of some sort of misconduct.

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